About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
MSNBCW 16
CNNW 10
CSPAN 9
KQED (PBS) 8
KGO (ABC) 4
KNTV (NBC) 4
LINKTV 4
CSPAN2 3
KCSM (PBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
FBC 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 83
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)
overwhelmingly reject a tax on savings. >> in syria, the government and rebels trade accusations of using chemical weapons in a village near aleppo. >> pope francis officially begins his papacy in rome with a promise to embrace the whole of humanity. >> in a vote expected to have wide ranging consequences, lawmakers in cyprus have delivered a decisive and overwhelming note to a government tax to lead the bank accounts. >> that means government cash for pensions, welfare, and health care could dry up as early as may. parliament voted less than an hour ago, following to be would days of high drama, handing the government and brussels a resounding defeat with no delegates voting in favor of the plan. 36 no votes and 19 abstentions. >> the house speaker had urged mp's to say no to blackmail in the vote on the bureau's own bailout package. his words clearly catching the angry mood in the chambers and on the streets. outside the parliament building, angry crowds also called for a no vote and held up signs, warning that other nations like italy and spain could be next in line. for the latest, le
's security, and to speak directly to the people of israel and to your neighbors. >> the israeli government hopes washington can help tackle the region's most pressing challenges. the upheavals triggered by the arabs spring have increased political instability, and the threat of iran's nuclear program is ever present, but not everyone is happy to see obama. palestinians in the occupied west bank and here on the gaza strip have been protesting. >> obama's visit shows that the u.s. is providing legitimacy and support to the occupation of our land. >> obama is scheduled to travel to the west bank and jordan before leaving the region on saturday. >> let's cross over now live to our correspondent, who is covering the president's visit for us. barack obama and benjamin netanyahu have not enjoyed the warmest of relationships. how did they come across at the press conference? >> this was an interesting press conference. they tried to joke around. they clearly tried to show that at this time, they were trying to put personal differences aside. experts all say they might not become best friends, but
, and a prime minister who has managed to establish control over a fractious government? or is it all those things? this is not a discussion rooted in the past. we will not relive the wmd questions. we will not dwell on the mistakes of the coalition authority, and we will not debate the surge. andill look at iraq today where it is headed. a has been little of that in the 10 years media coverage, even though it is a far more relevant question for policy makers and the public today. with that, because you did not come here to hear me today, that we introduce the plan all. you on the who they are. you know their contributions to the efforts to stabilize iraq. to my right is ambassador ryan crocker, who is the kissinger senior fellow at the el universal. he has served recently as our ambassador to afghanistan, his long career included ambassadors for iraq as well as our ambassador to pakistan, syria, kuwait, and lebanon. from may to august of 2003, he served as the government's director for the coalition provisional authority in baghdad, and his career in the foreign service included a tour in
reportedly showed damage after the government's artillery shells in an area of the bacchus province -- of damascus province. 's opposition has elected a new interim prime minister who it hopes will unify the area. ghassan hitto's first task will be to form a cabinet. who is he? used is 50 years old and to be an it manager. he is american educated and has u.s. citizenship. he moved to turkey to coordinate opposition aid. >> syria's new prime minister, as far as the opposition in exile as well as their international supporters are concerned. ghassan hitto's first priority, forming a cabinet. based inside syria, the interim government will need to establish legitimacy with people living in the 60% of the country estimated to be under assad forces.ti- >> tomorrow there will be a speech, and you will hear in introduction of the highlights .f the plan for the near future >> from the general who represents the majority of the armed groups fighting the assad regime, there is a promise of loyalty. >> we in the syrian army look to the government as a political umbrella for us, and we can ask
the rebel advance. it is the sort of richer vision government supporters meted out to their attackers could be overtaken by looting. >> they are killing us, raping us, looting. they are not allowing us to live. they have taken the state hostage. ,> seen here in better times has become an unpopular president. he has now suffered the same fate. only 10 weeks after the signing of a new power-sharing peace deal. with the celebrations, there was hope of some desperately needed stability. what was to follow was more death, more chaos and suffering for one of the poorest countries in the world. seneca rebels say they brought the president down because of his failure to deliver on promises. >> there well you -- they are very well organized. when the peace talks failed and they asked specifically for people in jail to be released and also for foreign troops, and ugandan troops to leave their country, one that did not materialize, the rest was history. the president has fled. >> this is a country rich with minerals, gold, but known for his poverty and history of coups and failed peace deals. people a
gathered outside in nicosia, but it does lead the government looking urgently for an alternative. we are following every twist and turn. the cyprian parliament has rejected this e you deal, but what are their options now -- the supreme it -- supremecypriot parliament.iot >> that is the question. there will be a lot of frantic negotiations and frantic talks going on between cyprus and brussels to try to come up with a credible alternative. tomorrow at 9:00 in the morning local time, political party leaders will convene with the president to try to come up with a credible alternative, a plan b. there has been a very clear message sent from cyprus to brussels, and it is this -- the bailout, the whole deal has had severe miscalculations. if anything comes back to a plan b, a to have to be radically different. >> i remember speaking to german officials, and they kind of shrugged off the idea that cypress, of all european countries, could cause a problem, but that is exactly what it is doing. and at exactly. this is the third smallest member of the eurozone, the third smallest economy in t
, eyewitnesses said the rebels control strategic locations. foreign forces helping the government also suffered a defeat. the south african soldiers were tasked with guarding bangui. is himself a former soldier. ruleast few months of his were turbulent. his term is not up until 2016. rebels said they want to hold elections. there is still heavy fighting in bangui. a peaceful transition is not on the cards. >> paris musharraf has returned home from self-imposed exile, declaring he was to save the country. musharraf spent the past four years in london and dubai, but now wants to take part in elections this may. >> coming home may herald a comeback for musharraf. greeting supporters after stepping off his flight. i've come back, putting my life in danger, in order to save pakistan. >> not everyone in pakistan is happy he is home. the military man made many enemies as president. in 2008, musharraf was forced to quit amid political turmoil i. his political past could come back to haunt him. pakistan's teledyne hates musharraf because he supported george w. bush's war on terror hatesevision -- taliba
shows some of the victims. we can't confirm. but russia, the syrian government's ally and main weapons provider, is backing the regime's claim. syrian rebel spokesman accuse the government of using the weapon, saying this is all part of president assad's propaganda effort to mislead public opinion. the white house says it has no evidence on either side that anyone used any chemical agent. we'll have more on the administration's reaction in a moment. >> first, let's get to jonathan hunt. impossible to know if this is true. but we can look at this video and draw at least some preliminary, well, conclusions. >> we can't be certain about anything, but if you look at the video that is allegedly from this attack, and shows the victims, there's nothing here that would indicate, for instance, gas, the twitching of the victims, vomiting, drooling, mustard good, you would see blistering on the skin. we don't see any of those things in this video, and also we have not yet heard anywhere in the past fewer months or past couple years, any evidence that the rebels themselves have got their hands on
in syria. ghassan hitto lived in the u.s. for decades but now he will govern parts of syria controlled by rebel forces. members of the syrian national coalition met in istanbul, turkey. they voted to elect hitto who moved to turkey last year to help coordinate the opposition. the coalition plans to launch an interim government for northern syria which is under rebel control. 70,000 syrians have died in two years of fighting between rebels and president bashar al assad's forces. analysts say some in the coalition see hitto as an outsider. they also doubt rebel groups which are not part of the coalition will accept an interim government. >>> people across iraq are looking back at a war that caused many problems. u.s. forces invaded their country. saddam hussein collapsed, but it continued on much longer. nhk world's sho beppu covered the war and its aftermath. he's now back in baghdad. sho, how are things in the iraqi capital now? >> reporter: right. i can say that it changed quite a lot compared to those worse days. it seems lively, at least on the surface, streets in baghdad are busy,
of government offices and businesses early. traffic jacks and some gridlock across the city. the same time, today was marked by new political uncertainty. lack lab announced provincial elections would be put off for six months. iraqi government sources are telling us now that the delay will be extented for all provinces across iraq. so in some, while the security has mostly improved in iraq over the last few years, the anniversary was a reminder of the darker days. >> bret: yeah, dave, what were you hearing and seeing? what were you hearing from the iraqis? were they shocked by this bombing, the series of bombings? >> guest: i think the bombings came as somewhat of a shock. although, everyone was aware of the anniversary. there have been bombings on previous verses haves, but the same time. the anniversary is a day that marks some upate and anger on the part of iraqis toward we werers. westerns are not so much of a target in iraq anymore. so depth and the amount of bombing was a surprise. certainly the announcement by prime minister al-awlaki was a big surprise. >> bret: what about the sec
government that any powerful weapon will be secured and destroyed. tois our response ability determine whether this can be done that ensures arms will not fall into terrorist organizations. i'm encouraged the syrian opposition chose the prime minister for exile yesterday. time is of the essence. there are difficult decisions that must be made in the days and weeks ahead. we continue to push for un security council resolution. do we provide military advisers and training? do we provide direct military assistance? if so, what kind? can assad be pushed to accept any negotiated conflict? the use of chemical weapons -- makes this more pressing. the use of chemical weapons by this regime would be horrific. 70,000 slaughtered syrians is terrific. horrific. the discussions we have in this committee are interesting. the fact that this is hard cannot stop us from acting. you and your colleagues know better than anyone there are no easy answers. inaction is not an option. i look forward to your testimony and i yield back. thank you. >> thank you. three minutes to the chairman of the middle east s
out. now the government says all banks will be closed till thursday as it negotiates the terms of this deal. gavin hewitt starts our coverage. >> hurt, anger, outrage -- that was the mood on the streets of the cypriot capital. in exchange for european bailout, small and large savers will have to pay a one-off tax. >> we are sleeping. we all come in the morning, knowing that we were significant -- >> as a nation, it has taken us 40 years to build our economy to the level it is. with done one day -- within one day, we have shot it down. we are very betrayed. >> they can do it anywhere. live in europe, europe has betrayed us. >> at one stage, the crowd was urged to march towards the presidential palace. many people believed their savings had been guaranteed. what is clear is that the bailout deal negotiated in brussels cannot be implemented here except in the face of furious opposition. will have depositors to pay -- just reducing the amounts savers and depositors will have to pay probably won't be enough. teeple are still trying to get their money out of cash machines, but there
on the pump. we also realize between the state and federal government a lot of us are paying 40-plus cents a gallon to build the road that we're wearing out with the gas we put in. that's a user's fee. when i came here and break this down and asked the question, of tax/user rth of gas fee, 18.3 cents a gallon, $1 of that, how much of that actually goes into roads and bridges? and i'll tell you it adds up like this -- then we reduce it a little bit on this number. three cents out of that dollar went for trails for bike trails, snowmobile trails and that sort of thing. 3%. there was a one time $16 million in one of our appropriation bills to do -- to clean graffiti off of the walls, retaining walls in new jersey. and i thought, can't they get their prisoners out there with a wire brush to do that? and 28% going for environmental arciological -- interest, looking for arrowheads and endangered species. can't somebody pay for that rather than the people driving on the roads? when you add davis-bacon to that, another 20%, 22%, so you have 3% for trails, you have 28% for our achepologicl and env
control over a fractious government? or is it all those things? this is not a discussion rooted in the past. we will not relive the wmd questions. we will not dwell on the mistakes of the coalition authority, and we will not debate the surge. we will look at iraq today and where it is headed. a has been little of that in the 10 years media coverage, even though it is a far more relevant question for policy makers and the public today. with that, because you did not come here to hear me today, that we introduce the plan all. all on the who they are.-- know who they are. you know their contributions to the efforts to stabilize iraq. to my right is ambassador ryan crocker, who is the kissinger senior fellow at the el sity. sal.-- yale univer he has served recently as our ambassador to afghanistan, his long career included ambassadors for iraq as well as our ambassador to pakistan, syria, kuwait, and lebanon. from may to august of 2003, he served as the government's director for the coalition provisional authority in baghdad, and his career in the foreign service included a tour in
do hussein was removed, for sure. at the government level, the strategic agreement is still in place, but it would not be wrong to say that the government of see at the moment does not the american presence or influence as an integral part of its political calculation. it was a few years ago when political decisions were taken. they always factored in what the americans fought and that was certainly true. you probably remember when your the ambassador to baghdad. i do not think that is the situation now. i would even ventured to say that there is more wait for what the iranian regime things about political decisions in iraq, whether it is forming a cabinet any other major political decision. thathat does not mean americans have lost all possible influence. i think americans still have a considerable amount of soft power. i think they should use it not only with the government, and they are actually using it, to be fair, in support of civil society. i think in supporting the segment of population who are secular in their outlook, who believe that the separation of religion from the st
government would be with peace toward the palestinians. let me be clear -- israel remains fully committed to peace and to the solution of a .wo state for two peoples we extend our hands in peace and friendship to the palestinian people. i hope that your visit him along with the visit of the secretary of state kerry help us turn a page in relations with the palestinians. let us sit down at the negotiating table. let us work together to achieve the historic compromise that will end our conflict once and for all. let me conclude on a personal note. i know how valuable the time and energy is of the american president, yourself. this is the 10th time we have met since you became president and since i became prime minister. you have chosen israel is your fort and then you -- venue your foreign visit and your second term. thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening that friendship and alliance between our two countries. it is deeply appreciated. you have come here on the eve of passover. i've always considered it it as our most cherished holiday. it celebr
by the intelligence agencies of governments who did not support my decision to remove saddam and it is true that much of the intelligence turned out to be wrong. >> warner: a report released this month put the cost of iraq's reconstruction at more than $60 billion so far. that on top of 1.7 trillion in estimated war costs according to a recent study by brown university. today some baghdad residents spoke of little progress and expressed anger at the united states. >> the americans did not do anything when they came to iraq. they granted freedom to iraq? what freedom are they talking about? >> warner: in washington, president obama issued a statement marking the anniversary saying he joined in paying tribute to all who served and sacrificed in one of our nation's longest wars. earlier i spoke to jane arraf a reporter earlier, i spoke to jane arraf, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is
putting members on the government payroll. little traction has gained despite high-profile controversies. as i mentioned earlier, a saide ago, jesse jackson kim my wife's company work for the campaign? opinion was that yes, she can, unless -- as long as certain things are met. we know jesse jackson pled guilty to misusing thousands of dollars in campaign funds for personal use. he clearly lost -- crossed the line. i think people are starting to think, maybe we should once again revisit what is happening, where is the line was -- with personal use? a few years earlier, there was a lot of scrutiny when the california sensitive -- , his wife'sve company was getting a 50% commission for his campaign. .- 15% commission people got caught up in the larger investigation into the lobbying scandal. he was never formally charged with wrongdoing, but that was an episode where people said earning commissions, is that appropriate? ?ost: what was the end result guest: nothing has changed. it is still legal. the whole compensation system is determined by the member of congress and his employees. or her
. the government feared it might not win a majority for the bailout. without extra funding, cyprus faces bankruptcy. the british community around -- the british community, around 60,000, is also assessing its losses. cypriot friends are in shock. >> they felt as though someone had put their hand in their pocket and taken their money without letting them know what was going on. >> others speak of a breach of trust. >> people are going to take their money out of the eurozone in general the guys they don't trust them -- because they don't trust them. >> they have been reducing the amount -- they have been discussing reduce the amount that small savers will have to pay. the crisis is threatening the eurozone. >> reports coming in from europe suggest the eu may have changed the deal, to allow people with deposits of less than 100,000 euros to get off that tax. i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary tim -- larry suckers -- i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary larry summers. >> it changed the world. sarah gave a was a small place -- sarajevo was a small place.
is this new tone going to be translated into the hard work of actually governing the church? there, of course, the challenges are considerably more steep >> ifill: we continue our series of stories about the middle east, margaret warner reports on the divide among the two leading palestinian factions, and its impact on the quest for peace. . >> it is really a divide over power. who's goi toontl what and what's going to be in a stronger position to win the palestinian people and who's going to have the narrative on its side? >> woodruff: and we examine a dramatic shift in public opinion with a majority of americans supporting same sex marriage. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated the idethaall peopleeserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting
's the whole issue of governing, management of the vatican and that's going to keep him very busy, indeed. >> yeah. just an immense amount of work that needs to be done. >> big job ahead of him. ben wedeman. there was one person who definitely did not want francis to become pope. >> someone rather close to him, knows him very well. the former argentine cardinal, we are talking about his sister, maria. take a listen to what she said. >>. >> translator: i pray that he wouldn't get elected. during the conclave, i was praying that the holy spirit would intervene and not listen to my prayers. and it didn't listen to me. >> translator: it didn't listen to you? >> no, it did as it pleased. >> she's very happy for her brother and it's quite likely her life will change, too. you can imagine the media folks hounding her. >> we're not going to leave her alone. >> forget about it. >> want to get back to a top story. financial crisis brewing in europe. cyprus needing a bailout. the country's parliament ready to vote on a plan that includes one-time tax on most of the country's bank accounts. >> contro
arm the syrian government, although it rawn insists it is humanitarian aid. the u.s. has asked iraq to force the planes to land in iraq for inspections. but only a few have been checked. they have long been a point of conflict between the and u.s. iraq. >> the intent here, fwy going public, is to increase the pressure on al-malma laki. but it shows how minimal our ability to affect the conflict in syria has become. >> kerry said that iraq can be be part of the political discussion about syria's future until cracks down on the iranian shipments. >> shannon: thank you very much. the head of the western-backed opposition in syria is supportedly stepping down, resigning out what have he calls frustration with a lack of international efforts to oust the leader assad. >> this resignation is really shows how fragmented the syrian opposition is and even if assad were to fall, the western allies don't know who to call and talk to. right now, the syrian opposition is in two camps. you have the free syrian army, the locals who have risen up against the regime. but on the other side, have you e
. as a global fleet operator serving both commercial and government customers, reliability and continuity of service are our highest priorities. whether it's uav operations over afghanistan or the final game of the ncaa tournament or financial statements that have to be transferred securely around the world, um, we know that our customers expect flawless performance. to deliver this level of performance, we have to daily deal with a range of threats. probably a highest priority for us today is radio frequency interference. many times it's accidental, sometimes intentional. space debris and other challenges of space flight, cyber attacks, solar weather, space systems reliability, the fact that we today don't have an affordable technical solution for refueling and repairing satellites on orbit and last but not least, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. space-based platforms have become a vital link in the national and global economies, and they're essential
to fund the federal government for the rest of the fiscal year. testifying about the ongoing two year civil war in syria. that live hearing starts at 9:45 eastern. this week marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the iraq war. in 45 minutes we will talk with california representative barbara lee, who opposed u.s. military action in iraq. and a congressman who served as a u.s. air force reserve chaplin, we will get his perspective on the war and veterans' issues. will, a virginia senator join us as part of our spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here
, to the prestige and credibility of the u.s. government are daunting and dismaying if we found the wmd it would have been different. it totally would have been different but we didn't. >> sure. right. >> so are the american people more likely to question the challenge of this country being capable and on a proper premise to go into war? >> absolutely. i mean, those poll numbers that you cited way back when, ten years ago, were reflective of what the american people were told by its government, by its president, its secretary of state, its secretary of defense. the case was made for going to war with iraq. you know, in a time of war the american people rally around the president. but as more information came out, as more facts and corrections of the record came out, the american people saw that they were in essence lied to about getting into a war, not one of necessity but one of choice. and so i think going forward, particularly with the saber rattling with iran and what's being talked about with north korea and its belligerence, the american people are going to be very cautious. i should say m
how government raises and spends money. >> wow. >> just 19% support the way congressional republicans are dealing with it. and it was nearly split. 47% sided with the president, 46% sided with republicans, and i wonder, joe, if this is at least inspiration enough for them to just get a deal. is anyone going to get worse than this? really? why can't they at least get something done. >>> i think politically the pressure is more on the president for this reason. you go -- you ask somebody -- it's kind of like lawyers. i found that everybody hated lawyers, right? >> yep. everybody loves their own lawyer. you should have seen what she did in court. man, let me give you my lawyer's number. it's the same thing with congressmen. everybody hates congressmen, but hey, my guy, my woman, they go up there and boy they fight. so, again, you've got to put yourself in the position of a congressman looking at 31% approval rating going, yeah, that's fine. i'm saying that 74%, the words of dire straits, you know, i got a daytime job, i'm doing all right. i think the pressure when you look at these numbe
? >>> overseas secretary of state john kerry delivered a blunt message to the government of iraq today. it was all about what's happening with syria and iran. nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell is with the secretary in baghdad. >> reporter: john kerry is the first secretary of state to come to iraq since hillary clinton in 2009. it's his first visit since he came as a senator at the height of the civil war in 2006. arriving today in secrecy, in the week when iraq saw some of its worst terrorist attacks in years to mark the tenth anniversary of the war. but kerry did not come primarily to discuss iraq. despite the smiles for the cameras, the secretary of state confronted iraq's prime minister maliki, accusing him of colluding with iran to prop up the assad regime by permitting almost daily weapons shipments from iran to syria through iraq's airspace. >> we had a very spirited discussion on the subject of the overflights. i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact helping to sustain president assad. and his regime. >> repo
are faced with a government reaching into their personal bank accounts to pay its bills. this is not like a tax. it's a smash and grab. the government runs the banks, so when they're failing and need money, they could keep the deposits that the citizens have inside their accounts. cyprus needs to come up with 7 1/2 billion dollars on its on in order to get the european unions to loan it the rest of the money to keep the country running. it's like matching funds in a highway and in belgium holding last minute talks with european leaders. they better talk quickly because the european bank has been giving emergency cash to cyprus to keep the banks there afloat. that cash stops tomorrow if there's no deal in the works. some pictures now from earlier. citizens filling the streets in panics and their businesses hurting from no cash flow and the atm's shut down. and they're worried the government will take their money. greg palkot is in cyprus and brenda buttner in the studio. let's go to graeg. what's the latest for cyprus. >> reporter: harris, it looks like it's going to be an all-nighter. an
on in iraq now is the shia plurality, dominating a government and trying to dominate the kurds and the sunnis. i think it is more a continuing ethnic struggle where iraq's neighbors wish them no good. the iranians supporting the shia, the sunni arabs supporting anb anbar provinces. >> the "washington post" describeding him as neither the failed state, nor the model democracy some had wanted. what is the state of the government right now from your perspective there? >> reporter: well, there is a few different tests. on one hand, it is a country that hasn't completely grappled with democracy. it hasn't struggled in materials of creating more political freedom but there is no doubt democracy has not taken route across the country. the central government still struggles in the northern part of the country under kurdish control. it is a loose amalf. the government is rife with political corruption. there is indeed as we just heard, sectarian tension among political parties. still a lot of missing people in iraq. so by some estimates, although there is more political freedom and freedom of expressi
think he just might. that question was never posein the u.s. government or the cia, despite very smart people theyci have there. >> rose: then they launched thele invasion, and was immediately successful.an saddam went into hiding.dd what happened in the days after that, that made, for most of us looking at it, and for most analysts-- and you included -- serious mistakes?ys >> well, i was there for that part-- this enterprise as an embeddd correspondent, both in the command and on the ground.on and the expectation was-- theth americans essentially fought last war. they fought the 2003 war as if it was an extension of the 1991x war. they thought you defeat the republican guard pup go to-- you defeat kind of the conventionali forces. and then war is done, and we're finish people say there wasn't a plan. there was a plan. itas to hand over as quicklyan as possibleo t iraqis themselves to take out driver, put in some new drivers into the vehicle, and let it go down the road. >> rose: that was rumsfeld's theory. >> it was also condi rice's. the institution would hold, we put new people in a
but now he will govern parts of syria controlled by rebel forces. members of the syrian national coalition met in istanbul, turkey. they voted to elect hitto who moved to turkey last year to help coordinate the opposition. the coalition plans to launch an interim government for northern syria which is under rebel control. 70,000 syrians have died in two years of fighting between rebels and president bashar al assad's forces. analysts say some in the coalition see hitto as an outsider. they also doubt rebel groups which are not part of the coalition will accept an interim government. >>> u.s. military leaders are showing off some high-tech hardware they could use against north korea. pilots taking part in a joint exercise with south korea are flying missions using b-52 bombers. the aircraft are capable of launching nuclear missiles and can simultaneously strike multiple targets. the u.s. military has b-52s at its bases in south korea. defense department spokesman george little said the b-52 missions are meant to be a deterrent. he said the aim is to demonstrate the u.s. military's capabilit
government in order for iraq to get over it's tensions, it's got to give the sunnis a role in the political sphere. will they do that going forward. we tend to think when the war ends or when the troops leave object with your interest departs. this is going to be a generational drugle for iraq. it's going to take 10 years or more to get to the point that jim jeffery hopes and i hope that they do. we've got to be there to help them. >> do you think folks living in iraq right now are glad overall 10 years later that this invasion and occupation happened and sadaam hussein was depolessed. >> the vast majority particularly among the large major city who are shia, or kurdish are happy is a doom hussein was deposed. many suffered under sadaam, but some resent the fact that they no longer had the position they had before. nonetheless, over all people are happy is a doom was deposed. >> do folks on the ground harbor resentment against america for the large body count and injuries sustained during the world. >> the default position of most populations in most countries is resentment of america we're
. they cleared the government's earthquake safety test introduced after the march 2011 earthquake and tsunami. legally, the utility can operate the reactors until the next regular inspection in september. attention is focused on whether the new safety guidelines will be applied to the reactors in july. chairman said after the planned regular inspections the two operating reactors will be checked to see if they meet the new safety requirements >>> the parliament of cyprus has rejeked a bill to bail out the nation's financial sector. lawmakers refused to approve a levie levy -- the european union and other creditors asked cyprus to impose a bank deposit tax of up to 9.9%. in return the country would receive a bailout worth $10 billion or worth $13 billion. the cypriot issued -- the company's banks have been crippled by debt. cyprus is expected to start a fresh round of negotiations with creditors. but the two sides are unlikely to reach an agreement any time soon. >>> insurgents have sent a message on the 10th anniversary of the invags of iraq. they killed at least 50 people and wounded more th
and journalists government officials. they loved it see if you love it when the movie opens in theaters friday. tonight check out splash a new celebrity diving competition show. >> this is scarier than i thought. i never knew i had this much fear of heights until now. it's crazy. >> catch action from "splash" premiers tonight at 8:00 here on abc. last night was the premier of "dancing with the stars". the lowest score went to dl hugly. >> i was never confident. i'm going to do better next week. >> catch a look at week one tonight at 9:00 on abc. for post show interviews go to otrc.com. >> still ahead a somber anniversary. how the bay area is honoring those killed in iraq 10 years since the war started. >> defiant behavior of an 18-year-old in court as he's sentenced for killing three students in >>> president ob yumma about to leave on a trip to the middle east. the white house says the visit will be geared towards winning hearts and minds of the israeli people. it include several symbolic stops. the president set to meet with israeli prime minister and then meet with palestinian's president b
of the government in the country had a very slender record of success and that iraq had none of the characteristics that would lead to success in such a venture. third, the argument was being made that it would trigger a tsunami of democratic transformation across the region, was at best a faith based argument. you were not there in 2002, but later you became a very strong critic of this effort. what was it that changed your mind, that led you to make the arguments you did in the mid- 2000's? >> i remember vividly the night when the war commenced. i was asked by the pbs news to be there. i remember vividly all of a sudden the news came that major explosions are taking place in baghdad, that baghdad is under air assault, and that the war had begun. i had such a sick feeling in my stomach. i said to myself, i just hope to god that we now find those weapons of mass destruction, because that was the reason why the war was started. i was already by then conscious of the fact that there was a deliberate confusion in terminology used by the administration to justify the initiation of hostilities. for the
. there is no precedent for something off that ticket and thrust into governing responsibility. the balance he has to strike is doing his demanding day job and maintaining his options in the event he wants to run for president and a difficult balance to strike. >> you know him well. do you sense he aspires to more nationally? did he get a taste for president politics the last time around? >> i don't want to speak for him but i think he continues to have a taste and ambition to have a big impact on some of these issues he cares about nationally. he's a number of ways he can do it punish. mark leibovich wrote that article. paul ryan can't lose. meaning he could run for president if he stays in congress, he'll be chairman of ways and means committee and some talk about him playing a more prominent role in leadership so he has to decide where he can make his mark. no one i believe has done more to advance the conservative policy agenda in terms of where he has moved through republican congress the last for a years. >> mark, he's a young man, in his early 40s. he has a lot of politics ahead of him. wha
understood why the government would come in the philippines, would utilize that approach to resolve this conflict. because after all, efforts have been made to reach an agreement to come to a mutually beneficial agreement. and that had failed. and, therefore, the ability to petition and to have a resolution of this through that method was logical. and i think that the resolution of these disputes have become by nature of using the rule of law. and that dispute mechanism resolution that exists under the treaty is an effective way, as i'm explaining to this you -- explained to the now, and effective way to address this problem. because our goal and our diplomacy is based on urging governance, not just the type of nationalist rhetoric that leads to confrontation. but instead, to work multinationally and order to resolve disputes. we can see periods in the past when nations with competing claims came very close to resolution, and, unfortunately, because of nationalist voices, in both countries, we failed to achieve that opportunity to resolve a situation. and that's what i think the uni
're isolating it even more. is the american government just dropping the ball on this thing like nothing else right now? >> i wouldn't say that they're dropping the ball. i would rather say that they're circling the wagons. this move of canceling private carriers that go to guantanamo now will severely cut access to the base by habeas lawyers and activists, those working for civil rights. they want to choke information out of guantanamo because it's all bad. >> michael: it seems also, colonel davis, not only is the information bad but this is not been prioritized. i'm wondering, colonel davis how does this become a priority for the president and the administration? it seems that it's a forgotten thing. is this hunger strike going to work? >> i doubt that it will. there have been hunger strikers before. there have been suicide that didn't get a lot of attention. if you look at the drone program. today the president or the white house is rumored to get the ca out of the drone business because the public is in such an uproar. so it's going to take the public standing up and saying, look, this is
governments the united states wants to trust, when there are difficult things, you need help from the region, it is usually turkey and syria. to have it back on a better track, not completely there, but on a better track is better for the region, israel and turkey, huge assist for the united states. >> and he pushed bb netanyahu, a stubborn man sometimes to do this. a real accomplishment for the president who set low expectations, so he exceeded low expectations they set probably deliberately. >> israel, turkey, significant achievement. he played a critical role in that. jessica, john, safe trip back to washington. >>> now the latest rounds of threats from north korea. ominously from the country supreme military command which regularly parades an arsenal of missiles and rockets through the streets of pyongyang. they claim north korea has the capacity to hit military bases in guam and japan. we have a closer look, ominous discussion there, tom. >> it is, wolf. you have to put it in context. couple weeks ago, north korea talked about putting a nuclear missile on the u.s. mainland, a lot of and
would scoop as much as 10% from everyone's bank account. >> so of course it's got the government worried about the banks. the banks will be closed in cypress for the next couple days. we're going to go live to europe and why it's rattling the markets in the united states as well. >> all over the world. meanwhile world leaders continue to arrive for the inauguration of pope francis. there's zimbabwe's long ruler made his way to rome. >> and vice president joe biden is leading the delegation for the united states. he's joining a long list of leaders and dignitaries who will witness the official installation of the former cardinal from argentina. francis is the first latin american to head the catholic church. >>> inmates back in custody but not until they had broken out of jail in quebec in rather unusual fashion. >> one witness describes it kind of as a james bond moment. you have these inmates hoisted onto a hijacked helicopter, flew away and then this is all happening in broad daylight. >> amazing scene. paula newton is in ottawa. it does sound like something out of a movie. this has ha
by not believing the people who lied to you before. the american government lied to its own people. honestly, i don't know of a worse lie one could tell other than a lie to take a country to war. to make up things to take people to war. that's got to be the most obscene, immoral thing to do. so this government hasn't earned the right to be trusted. if it says assad has chemical weapons or ahmadinejad has a nuclear weapon -- >> but it's not this government, is it, that went to war with saddam. >> which government? you're talking about obama versus bush? >> yes. >> i'm talking about the real government. wall street, the banks, people who made $2.2 trillion we spent on the iraq war. who made the money? soldiers in the field? i don't think so. this is always about the people who have the purse strings and the politicians bought by them. if they come on now and tell me anything about ahmadinejad is building a bomb. really? i'll believe it when he walks in the room with it and shows me. that's how much i don't trust anything said by the military industrial complex of this great country. >> when you see w
it was with the potential for a government shutdown, which has now been averted. so again, back to this new pace rhine of these big debates over real issues that are kind of going nowhere. and a new baseline that incidentally it's interesting because their stopgap spending bill that was passed yesterday did mark something of a breakthrough in that the appropriators in the house and the senate, the bipartisan leaderships thereof were able to come together and come up with a spending plan that keeps the government solvent and keeps it operating. and so i think that now we are going to see the appropriators get, you know, being able to get together hopefully and work out these, you know, technocratic stopgap spending bills while the battle wages in the background without any hope of actual consensus. >> good to see both of you. have a good weekend. we are hearing this morning from the commander of the marine base in kwaunt coe, virginia where three were killed. ask as we take care of our marines and their families that are dealing with this tragedy, i'd also ask for the support of our neighbors, the comm
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)